Workshops 2014

Symposium: Der Antikommunismus in seiner Epoche. Weltanschauung, Bewegung, regierende Partei

Datum: 13.-15. November 2014
Ort: Rosensäle der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Fürstengraben 27, Jena
Veranstalter: Jena Center Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts und Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena

Wie der Kommunismus zählt auch der Antikommunismus zu den politisch-ideologischen Großphänomenen, die das 20. Jahrhundert prägten. Die Forschung hat bislang vor allem antikommunistische Organisationen in den Blick genommen, zumeist mit Fokus auf der Zwischenkriegszeit oder auf dem Kalten Krieg. Im Zentrum unseres Interesses steht nicht so sehr die Vielfalt antikommunistischer Zusammenschlüsse, sondern vielmehr die Frage, warum antikommunistische Ideologien und Ideologen über Jahrzehnte hinweg große Wirkungsmacht entfalten konnten.
Weshalb konnte der Antikommunismus in fast allen Teilen der Welt weit über den kleinen Kreis der "Hardliner" hinaus mobilisierend wirken? Wie wurde er zu einem gemeinsamen politischen Nenner für Parteien, Institutionen und Intellektuelle, die ansonsten uneins oder gar zerstritten waren? Worin lag die gesellschaftliche Bedeutung des Antikommunismus, was machte ihn anschlussfähig für so viele politische, soziale und kulturelle Grundfragen seiner Epoche?

Das Programm zur Tagung finden Sie als PDF-Dokument hier

Presseberichte zu der Tagung finden Sie auf der Homepage des Jena Centers unter http://www.jenacenter.uni-jena.de/Presse.html 

Conference: “Collective vs Collected Memories. 1989-91 from an Oral History Perspective”

Date: Thursday, 06 November 2014 - Saturday, 08 November 2014
Conference venue: UNIVERSITY OF WARSAW LIBRARY, DOBRA 56/66 STREET, ROOM 316
Organizers and PartnersEuropean Network Remembrance and Solidarity (ENRS), Federal Institute for Culture and History of the Germans in Eastern Europe, Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena, Institute of Sociology at the University of Warsaw, Institute for East European Studies at the Free University of Berlin, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Oral History Archive of the History Meeting House and KARTA Centre.

The fourth conference from the "Genealogies of Memory in Central and Eastern Europe" series organized by the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity is dedicated to the memory of 1989-91 in post-socialist countries. During three days, dozens of historians, sociologists and anthropologists from more than twenty countries will exchange views on what unites and what divides the memories of transformation in Central and Eastern Europe. The participants of the conference will discuss the dominant narratives and explore what has been left unsaid in both the individual and collective recollections of transformation, with particular emphasis on the social memory in Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, the Baltic states, the former Yugoslavia, Hungary and Ukraine. The conference will attempt to answer questions of the type:

 

  • What different horizons of expectation and realms of experience pertained in 1989-1991? How have these expectations and experiences been articulated, transmitted, and reconstructed?
  • How have different social and professional groups understood and discussed the origins, events and consequences of 1989-1991?
  • How have dominant narratives of 1989-1991 evolved in the political, cultural, and academic-educational realms nationally and transnationally? 


On the first day of the conference key note speeches will be given by James V. Werstch (Washington University in St. Louis), Michael Bernhard (University of Florida) and Jan Kubik (Rutgers University). Two of the conference panels will be dedicated to reflections on the past, present and future of oral history in Central and Eastern Europe. The participants will be recognized scholars who represent the Western and Eastern European schools of oral history, including Lutz Niethammer (Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena), Alexander von Plato (Fern Universität Hagen), and Irina Sherbakova (Memorial). Single conference sessions will focus on subjects like the relationships between collective and individual memory, the memory of various generations, and stories of economic changes.

The program of the conference can be viewed here

Please find more information on Genealogies Project under: Genealogies of Memory Project

Conference: Alternative Encounters: The ‘Second World’ and the ‘Global South’, 1945-1991

Date: Monday, 03 November 2014  - Tuesday, 04 November 2014
Location: Imre Kertész Kolleg, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Conference venue: Rosensäle, Fürstengraben 27, 07743 Jena

In collaboration, the Imre Kertész Kolleg (University of Jena), the Centre for Area Studies (University of Leipzig), and the Centre of Imperial and Global History (University of Exeter) will hold a conference on 'alternative encounters' in the post-war period. As decolonization accelerated, new linkages opened up and existing ties were remade between the so-called ‘Second World’ (from the Soviet Union to the German Democratic Republic) and the ‘Global South’ (from Latin America to Africa to Asia). The conference seeks to address the lacuna concerning interaction between these areas by bringing together specialists working on forms of exchange, intervention, and subjugation.  In doing so, it seeks to provide new insights into the global circulation of ideas during the Cold War and explore ‘the socialist world’ as a dynamic hub of global interactions during the second half of the twentieth century.

In the post-war period, as decolonization accelerated, new linkages opened up, and existing ties were remade, between the so-called ‘Second World’ (from the Soviet Union to the GDR) and the ‘Global South’ (from Latin America to Africa to Asia). Contacts multiplied through, for instance, the development of political linkages; economic development and aid; health and cultural and academic projects; as well as military interventions.  Yet these important encounters, and their impacts on national, regional and global histories, have hitherto only played a marginal role in accounts of late 20th century globalization, which have mainly focused on links between the West and former colonies, or between the countries of the ‘Global South’. There is still little study of the interaction between these areas, where commonly shared – and contested – beliefs in the power of socialist modernization and anti-imperial culture opened up possibilities of meaningful transfers during the Cold War and its aftermath. This conference seeks to address this lacuna, by bringing together specialists working on forms of exchange, intervention and subjugation.  In doing so, it seeks to provide new insights into the global circulation of ideas during the Cold War, and explore ‘the socialist world’ as a dynamic hub of global interactions during the second half of the twentieth century.

The program of the conference can be viewed here


Enquiries about attendance should be sent to: imre-kertesz-kolleg(at)uni-jena(dot)de 

Conference: Himmler’s Supranational Militia: Indigenous Participation in SS- and Police Units during the Second World War

Date: 28 - 30 May 2014
Conference venue: Toruń University
Organizers: University of Toruń, Imre Kertész Kolleg, University of Jena and the Centre for War Studies at University College Dublin

The existing literature on non-German volunteers in the Waffen-SS and police formations in occupied Europe is highly uneven, both in terms of quality and geographical coverage. While non-German soldiers fighting alongside the Wehrmacht have received some scholarly attention, even the more academically sound publications on the Waffen-SS of recent years have tended to prioritize a national or German-centric perspective over transnational, cultural history approaches. Our international conference, co-organized by the University of Toruń, the University of Jena and the Centre for War Studies at University College Dublin, is generously supported by the Fritz-Thyssen-Foundation. With contributors from virtually all countries affected by collaboration, the conference will seek to address some of the gaps in the existing scholarly literature.

The program of the conference can be viewed here

Workshop "Exhibiting Violence"

Quelle: Flickr, © Yannik Vernet

Date: 28 February - 1 March 2014
Conference Venue: Goethe Institute Lille & Historial de la Grande Guerre, Péronne
Contact: Dorothea Warneck M.A. dorothea.warneck(at)uni-jena(dot)de

During the twentieth century, large parts of Europe have been affected by war, violence and oppression. The First World War marked the beginning of a new form of representing war and violence in museums, including the sufferings of civilians. Experiences of total destruction and widespread death brought on debates about how to exhibit these existential experiences.
The central aim of the workshop is to discuss the origins of presenting violence and war in museums both in Western and East Central Europe during and right after World War I as well as to discuss central issues of a new ethic of objects of war and violence in presenting them in museums in Western and East Central Europe, today.
The workshop in Lille and Péronne aims to reflect on history and its role in current theoretical debates focusing on the question of a new sensitivity of exhibiting and viewing objects of war and violence in historical museums in Western and East Central Europe.


In cooperation with the Goethe-Institute Lille and the Historial de la Grande Guerre in Péronne.

The programme can be viewed here: Workshop "Exhibiting Violence".